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TheMidnighter

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xx Alan Moore (ABC/Tom Strong/Promethea/etc)
« Thread started on: Jul 10th, 2005, 10:50am »

This topic is to discuss all the Alan Moore books you've read. Just some examples:
League of Extraordinairy Gentlemen
From Hell
Watchmen
Promethea
Tom Strong
Top Ten
V for Vendetta.
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xx Re: Alan Moore (ABC/Tom Strong/Promethea/etc)
« Reply #1 on: Jul 10th, 2005, 4:10pm »

on Jul 10th, 2005, 10:50am, TheMidnighter wrote:
This topic is to discuss all the Alan Moore books you've read. Just some examples:
League of Extraordinairy Gentlemen
From Hell
Watchmen
Promethea
Tom Strong
Top Ten
V for Vendetta.


Cool.

Like I said in my thread for it, I recently read Watchmen. It rocks ass. cool
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xx Re: Alan Moore (ABC/Tom Strong/Promethea/etc)
« Reply #2 on: Jul 12th, 2005, 09:27am »

It took me four readings or so, but I finally understand Watchmen. Now I really want to read "From Hell".
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xx From Hell
« Reply #3 on: Jul 12th, 2005, 11:01am »

From Hell is awesome. It's really absolutely great. I love it. I really do need to figure out the ending, though. Even in the appendix, Moore says you have to figure it out for yourself... I. Just. Can't.
9+/10

I've written a review for it in Dutch, maybe I'll translate it and put it here. But it's a safe bet you'll like it when you buy it.
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xx Re: Alan Moore (ABC/Tom Strong/Promethea/etc)
« Reply #4 on: Aug 22nd, 2005, 9:56pm »

It's semi-related to the topic:

Can someone post the monologue from V for Vendetta where V is talking to Lady Justice? I need it for an audition for a school play.
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xx Re: Alan Moore (ABC/Tom Strong/Promethea/etc)
« Reply #5 on: Aug 27th, 2005, 2:00pm »

I don't have the book. Sorry.
I'll google it............................. And I could not find it. I found your post on SHH though cheesy.
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xx Re: Alan Moore (ABC/Tom Strong/Promethea/etc)
« Reply #6 on: Aug 27th, 2005, 4:03pm »

on Aug 27th, 2005, 2:00pm, TheMidnighter wrote:
I don't have the book. Sorry.
I'll google it............................. And I could not find it. I found your post on SHH though cheesy.


Yeah, I was asking around and eventually got it at a joint called "Superhero Chat" (think this board but with a lot of sex, and you'd be close). Thanks for trying, though. grin
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xx short review of From hell
« Reply #7 on: Sep 6th, 2005, 08:03am »

From Hell


What is the Fourth Dimension?


At first glance, this book deals with the identity of Jack the Ripper: who was he and what were his motives?
The story was originally published in 14 parts but it is also collected in a massive tradepaperback, along with 2 appendices, which encompases over 550 pages and has gone back to print yet again.

Next to Alan Moore's phenomenal story, there is the beautiful black and white artwork of Eddie Campbell. Beautiful, very detailed, interesting perspectives and a lot more to keep your interest sparked.
Mind you: this book is detailed and it deals about Jack the Ripper -- the faint of heart are better to leave this jewel on the shelves.

In From Hell, Alan Moore speculates about Jack the Ripper's identity. He used multiple sources for this and has, where possible, interpret these by himself and has come up with some ideas other 'Ripperologists' are not in agreement with. But, like Moore says in his foreword, this story is fictional; only of the death of the five prostitutes are we certain.

Prince Albert, a member of the Royal Family, concieves a child with Annie Crook, a prositute, during the time that he had taken on another identity after he run away from his family. For the Royal Family, this will of course be a big disgrace would the public hear about this. After a while, Albert gets found and they return him.
Friends of Annie Crook know about this scandal and start blackmailing the Royal Family.

To say this book is about Jack the Ripper is a bit too focussed - it makes you think this book deals about a murderer. I'm not denying it involves Jack the Ripper, but Jack the Ripper has the function of a coat rack -- using Jack the Ripper, Moore tells a story with much complexity, many layers and a cool theory about time. From Hell even uses Jack the Ripper as a portal from the 19th to the 20th century.

The 50 pages of appendices will scare some people (especially appendix I because it has nothing but text; Appendix II is at least a comic) but I would urge you to read it because there is such a lot of interesting information in it, that it would be a shame to pass up on. When reading From Hell, I would really suggest you read the appendices as well.

And the ending... It's so frustrating that I do not get the scene on page 23-25 from chapter 14. If you've read it and get that part, please tell me what it means.
I've got an idea but it's not really waterproof.

This is a magnificant book. It has such a complex storyline that I cannot imagine you will not be impressed by the writer, even if you didn't like the story.


Not my favorite book ever, but it is one of the most impressive ones.
9+/10
« Last Edit: Jun 30th, 2006, 11:49pm by TheMidnighter » User IP Logged

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xx review of Watchmen
« Reply #8 on: Sep 6th, 2005, 08:39am »

Watchmen


Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?


Watchmen is the most praised and most respected comicstory, ever. Just like frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns and Art Spiegelman's Maus, Watchmen was published in the 80's and these titles were a changingpoint for comics: adult stories were introduced in a medium that was before then mainly thought of as being 'for kids'.

Watchmen was written by Alan Moore, drawn by Dave Gibbons and coloured by John Higgins and have little to no doubt that, after reading this book, you will have nothing but respect for these people.

Watchmen is a mixture of all the parts of the world: political issues, emotional confrontations between people, the difference between the rich and the poor, impotency and rape, the moral question of the end justifies the means and for the fans: psychological phenomenas such as the bystander effect and self-fulfilling prophecies (although they are not prominent).

The story has a few differences from the real world, but still, the setting is realistic and has credibility which is an achievement by itself with a story involving superheroes.

The story is set during the mid-80's in America. Tension between Russia and America is rising and the threats from both sides are getting more and more aggresive - the newspapers are full with it. Politically, the thing is about to burst and World War Three is dooming at the horizon.
In the 70's, a law was passed: the Keene Act. This law forbids people to get on the streets as superheroes and make them live by the law: vigilanties are illegal.
The differences from reality are that Nixon is still president and that America has won the Vietnam war, thanks to Dr. Manhattan, a superhero.

An ex-superhero has been murdered. Edward Blake, the Comedian, has been killed; thrown out of his appartment window. Rorschach, the only vigilante that does not obey the Keene Act because he feels it's his duty to rid the Earth of scumbags, is investigating this murder. Rorschach suspects that whoever killed Blake, knew that he used to be The Comedian and Rorschach suspect he is witnessing the results of a conspiracy, a conspiracy to kill 'masks', or superheroes.
Rorschach questions ex-superheroes, ex-supervillains, the underworld and pays visits to everyone he finds a suspect.

This truly magnificant story was published in 12 single issues and the tradepaperback is divided accordingly.
Every chapter has a 'normal' comic which tells the story. At the end of each chapter, we find additional information such as newspaper clippings, exerpts from someones autobiography, psychological evaluations, interviews and the likes.
Inside the normal comic, there is a fluid dance of a truly brilliant woven set of the storylines Watchmen contains. These many storylines make Watchmen so complex and therefore so genius. It's not only the building of a plot that finds it origin 20 years in the past, but also the interaction of what seamingly unimportant people on the street say to each other with the narrative of a comic in the newspapers.

Every chapter of Watchmen has several things in common: every cover of the original comics functions as the first frame of the story (so the story starts before you've opened the book); every title of a chapter is a part from a quote that will be given in total at the end of that chapter; every chapter has its own theme which is presented on the cover, usually on the first and last page and thoughout the chapter, like a smileybutton, symmetry/reflection or a photo laying on Mars.

The climax is sublime and, ethically, sickening.

The first time you read the book, I doubt that you would pick out the subtle hints that you can find within the newspaperclippings, interviews etc. at the end of every chapter. My suggestion is to skip those the first time you read Watchmen because it will probably only bore you. Make sure you get the story when you've finished it and then read it again -- you will pick out most if not all of the clues and have a lot more respect for Moore. The first time I've read Watchmen i thought it was pretty cool but the middle part bore me. The second time I read it, I flew through it in 3 days, including the extra stuff at the end of the chapters, and I was nothing but overwhelmed by the sheer genius and build-up of the story.

This book has a lot of beauty: the kiss Silk Spectre I gives on the photo at the end, the entire chapters 4 and 9 and the end frame -- close the book and look at the cover (if you have the TPB); now that's closure.

Phenomenal story with a brilliant open ending. I give it a fat 9.5/10.
(After my first reading, I would've given it 8/10.)
« Last Edit: Sep 6th, 2005, 08:41am by TheMidnighter » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Alan Moore (ABC/Tom Strong/Promethea/etc)
« Reply #9 on: Sep 16th, 2005, 9:43pm »

Read the first volume of Top Ten recently. Like just about everything Alan does, it was awesome. I mean, it has a talking dog in a exo-suit, how can it NOT be awesome?! cool
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xx on my list
« Reply #10 on: Sep 19th, 2005, 05:21am »

That one is on my to-buy-list as well. Tell me some more: the overall outline of the story, how's the art (wasn't it Gene Ha?). Bring a little elaboration or detail in your review, please.
That is, if you have the time -- no pressure.
« Last Edit: Sep 19th, 2005, 05:21am by TheMidnighter » User IP Logged

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xx Re: on my list
« Reply #11 on: Sep 25th, 2005, 4:11pm »

on Sep 19th, 2005, 05:21am, TheMidnighter wrote:
That one is on my to-buy-list as well. Tell me some more: the overall outline of the story, how's the art (wasn't it Gene Ha?). Bring a little elaboration or detail in your review, please.
That is, if you have the time -- no pressure.


Yeah, Gene Ha does the art.

As for the story, it's mostly little stories packed into one. There's a conspiracy with some strange killer of prostitutes, the murder of a god, things of that sort. There's also smaller character stuff as well.

It's kind-of complicated to explain, but if you like Moore's style, then you wouldn't be disapointed.
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xx Re: Alan Moore (ABC/Tom Strong/Promethea/etc)
« Reply #12 on: Sep 26th, 2005, 2:42pm »

Is From Hell as dense (storytelling wise, not that it's stupid) as everyone says it is?
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xx native...
« Reply #13 on: Sep 27th, 2005, 02:46am »

I don't quite get the meaning of 'dense', but I'll just interpret it as if coming from 'density' and therefore you would mean that the story is literally cramped up with content. Is that what dense is?

Anyway, to answer your question (or my interpretation of your question cheesy): yes.
Although I do not know how much there is in From Hell, I can tell you it's really heavy -- it's got a lot in there (not just the Ripper killings; actually, they're not really about that - it says ) and this book is not an easy read. That's not a bad thing by any means. Actually, I love it for it. As I've stated in my review, it's partly such an impressive piece of work because of the sheer complexity (density?).

So yeah, I guess to call it dense is right, probably even an understatement but you have to undergo it for yourself.
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xx Re: Alan Moore (ABC/Tom Strong/Promethea/etc)
« Reply #14 on: Oct 15th, 2005, 3:47pm »

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Volume I:

I saw the movie first.

By that time, I was well aware of Moore's curse when it comes to movie adaptations of his work, but it was on HBO at one point and I thought what the hell. I thought it was preety good, albiet kind-of stupid.

Recently, I found the first volume at my local library. I thought this was going to be a frickin' godsend, considering how I've heard this rocked compared to the movie. But, really...it was just as good, even a little less.

I never really got attached to any of the characters, at least, not like Moore's other work (Watchmen) or even the movie itself.

It wasn't really BAD, just a little average.
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